Moth Orchid


2 entries found.
Moth Orchid
Common Name: Moth Orchid, Phalaenopsis Orchid
Botanical Name: Phalaenopsis spp. (fay-len-OP-sis)
Decorative Life: Ranges from 20-30 days or more in some cases.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Recut stems under water and place into a fresh flower food solution. Maintain under high humidity.
  • Avoid damaging the pollen cap as this begins the wilting process. Adding calcium chloride (110 ppm) to flower food or hydration solutions can reduce ethylene-induced damages. Non-pollinated flowers can last for weeks while pollinated ones may only last 24-48 hours.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Orchidaceae (orchid family).
  • Native to Asia, Malaysia.
  • Common relatives include Cymbidium, Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Cattleya.
Personality:
  • Flowers are up to 4 inches across, sepals and petals rounded, lip is anchor-shaped and often colored differently.
  • Stems are 18-24 inches long bearing up to 15 flowers.
  • Plant is an epiphytic perennial (in nature it grows attached to tree limbs), classed as a monocotyledon, leaves mostly parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Year-round.
Flower Color: White, pink, violet, yellow, blue, combinations.
Storage Specifics: Chill sensitive, store above 55F.
Tidbits:
  • From the Greek "phalaina" (a moth) and "opsis" (resembles), referring to the likeness of the flower to a large moth.
  • Orchids have long been highly sought after, probably for the unusual beauty of their design. Orchid hunters in the nineteenth century collected them by the ton, and chopped down as many as four thousand trees at one time for the Orchids growing on them.
  • Most are classified as "epiphytes" or air plants as they grow on other plants and elevated supports. They are not parasites but obtain water and nutrients through a spongy covering of their roots.
  • Chilling injury or ethylene damage appears as translucent or dried patches on petals and sepals.
  • This family is generally believed to contain the largest number of species, somewhere around 30,000.
Moth Orchid
Common Name: Moth Orchid, Phalaenopsis Orchid
Botanical Name: Phalaenopsis spp. (fay-len-OP-sis)
Decorative Life: Individual flowers can last up to 120 days while many plants can remain in flower for 6-9 months.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Non-pollinated flowers can last for weeks while pollinated ones may only last 24-48 hours.
  • Avoid damaging the pollen cap as this begins the wilting process.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Orchidaceae (orchid family).
  • Native to Asia, Malaysia.
  • Common relatives include Cymbidium, Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Cattleya.
Personality:
  • Flowers are up to 4 inches across, sepals and petals rounded, lip is anchor-shaped and often colored differently.
  • Stems are 18-24 inches long bearing up to 15 flowers.
  • Plant is an epiphytic perennial (in nature it grows attached to tree limbs), classed as a monocotyledon, leaves mostly parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Year-round.
Flower Color: White, pink, violet, yellow, blue, combinations.
Storage Specifics: Chill sensitive, store above 55F. Holding plants at 66F for 8 days did not stimulate flower or bud drop.
Tidbits:
  • From the Greek "phalaina" (a moth) and "opsis" (resembles), referring to the likeness of the flower to a large moth.
  • Orchids have long been highly sought after, probably for the unusual beauty of their design. Orchid hunters in the nineteenth century collected them by the ton, and chopped down as many as four thousand trees at one time for the Orchids growing on them.
  • Most are classified as "epiphytes" or air plants as they grow on other plants and elevated supports. They are not parasites but obtain water and nutrients through a spongy covering of their roots.
  • Will generally do well in light levels at least bright enough to read a newspaper in comfort but more light would be better. Chilling injury or ethylene damage appears as translucent or dried patches on petals and sepals.
  • This family is generally believed to contain the largest number of species, somewhere around 30,000.
Recent Findings: Wolverton and Wolverton (1992) showed that this is one of many foliage and flowering plant species that can remove air pollutants such as formaldehyde and/or benzene often found in cigarette smoke from interior environments.