Hyacinth


2 entries found.
Hyacinth
Common Name: Hyacinth
Botanical Name: Hyacinthus orientalis (hy-a-SIN-thus or-ee-en-TAL-is)
Decorative Life: Can last 1-3 weeks depending on stage purchased and interior conditions.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Some cultivars may require staking to hold up the flower stems because as they develop their weight can become too much for the stalk to maintain upright, a disorder sometimes referred to as stem topple. For example, in one test stem topple ranged from 8-25% for 'Ostara' while no stem topple was observed for 'Amsterdam'.
  • Some people are allergic to touching the bulbs. Therefore, make sure hands are washed after handling them. Or, wash the bulbs off with water prior to handling.
Harvest Instructions: Harvest when the first florets just begin to show color or earlier. Growers can use Florel to reduce or prevent stem topple.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Liliaceae (lily) family.
  • Native to the Mediterranean region and South Africa.
  • Common relatives include tulip, lily, burn plant (aloe) and asparagus.
Personality:
  • Plant is a herbaceous perennial from a bulb, classed as a monocotyledon, leaves mostly parallel veined.
  • The inflorescence is 4-6 inches long with bell-shaped florets.
  • Stems are leafless (scape), thick and fleshy, 8-12 inches long.
  • Flowers produce very strong and pleasant fragrances.
Availability: Mostly winter-spring.
Flower Color: Red, pink, white, yellow, blue.
Storage Specifics: Marketable plants should be stored at 32-36F.
Tidbits:
  • Some less than honorable individuals have sold individual flowers of white flowered cultivars for the much more expensive stephanotis flower, also known as Madagascar Jasmine.
  • With over 3000 species, the lily family includes many medicinal and food species in addition to ornamentals.
  • The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology list this species as an allergy-safe pollen producing plant.
  • Will generally do well in light levels at least bright enough to read a newspaper in comfort but more light would be better.
Recent Findings: Hyacinth bulbs have been known for years to cause skin irritation, contact eczema and respiratory irritation in humans. Piirila et al. (1998) were the first to document occupational asthma caused by hyacinth.
Hyacinth
Common Name: Hyacinth
Botanical Name: Hyacinthus orientalis (hy-a-SIN-thus or-ee-en-TAL-is or or-ee-en-TAY-lis)
Decorative Life: 3-7 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • There are reports that leaving the basal plate intact at harvest and all the way through the marketing channel will extend vaselife. Namely, they state that the stems should never be recut, only the bottom portion should be rinsed off (cleaned). By leaving the basel plates on, water uptake is improved.
  • Flower stalks of some cultivars may require support to prevent bending due to the increased weight as the stalks elongate and flowers develop.
Harvest Instructions: Harvest when florets begin to show color and one or more flowers should bend horizontally off of the stem (scape).
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Liliaceae (lily family).
  • Native to the Mediterranean region, Asia Minor and Syria.
  • Common relatives include lily, tulip, asparagus and daylily.
Personality:
  • The inflorescence is 4-6 inches long with bell-shaped florets.
  • Stems leafless, thick and fleshy, 8-12 inches long.
  • Plant is a herbaceous perennial from a bulb, classed as a monocotyledon, leaves mostly parallel veined.
  • Flower fragrance intense, sweet.
Availability: Winter, early spring in northern hemisphere.
Flower Color: White, blue, pink, red, yellow.
Storage Specifics: Store at 36-41 F for up to 3 days dry and 5 days in water, prolonged refrigeration may cause chilling injury, reduce vaselife and/or reduce fragrance. As with tulips, flowers harvested with the bulbs still attached can be stored longer and generally do better than ones without bulbs.
Tidbits:
  • Named after Hyacinthus, a Greek youth whose friendship was the object of a feud between Apollo and Zephyrus (the west wind). Zephyrus accidentally killed Hyacinthus and Apollo changed his drops of blood into the hyacinth flower.
  • In ancient Greece a yearly festival called Hyacinthia was held to celebrate the resurrection of vegetation in the spring.
  • With over 3000 species, the lily family includes many medicinal and food species in addition to ornamentals.
  • The specific epithet name "orientalus" means eastern or China, in reference to its origin. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology lists this species as an allergy-safe pollen producing plant.
  • Some florists have been known to substitute white hyacinth flowers for stephanotis. This practice is fine as long as customers know this and they are not paying stephanotis prices!
Recent Findings: Hyacinth bulbs have been known for years to cause skin irritation, contact eczema and respiratory irritation in humans. Piirila et al. (1998) were the first to document occupational asthma caused by hyacinth.