Paper-White Narcissus


2 entries found.
Picture of Paper-White Narcissus Paper-White Narcissus
Common Name: Paper-White Narcissus
Botanical Name: Narcissus papyraceus (nar-SIS-us pap-i-RA-see-us)
Decorative Life: 5-8 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Recut stems and place into a fresh flower food solution or plain water as some brands of fresh flower foods do not extend vaselife and can even be detrimental. Run tests to determine which flower food brand or water is best.
  • Cut stems exude sap that can be detrimental to other flowers therefore store separately in water for about 6 hours before mixing with other flowers. Do not recut again when arranging without foam if at all possible or else the 6 hour wait would have to be repeated. However, if the flower food solution being used has a good germicide, the sap may not be harmful to other flowers. See the recent research findings below for more information in this subject area.
Family Roots:
  • As a member of the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis family), its common relatives include Agapanthus, snowflake, snowdrop, Nerine, kafir-flower, Amaryllis and Lycoris.
  • Native to the western Mediterranean.
Personality:
  • It is a monocotyledon produced from bulbs.
  • From 10-20 very fragrant florets are produced on a leafless stem (scape) 15 inches or more in length.
Availability: Late fall to early spring.
Flower Color: Mostly bright white. However, the subspecies "polyanthus" has pale sulphur-yellow flowers when they are young, becoming white as they age.
Storage Specifics: Can be stored at 32-33F for up to 10 days or 36-38F for up to 8 days. Dry (preferred) or wet store but keep stems upright to prevent stem bending (geotropism).
Tidbits:
  • Some references say this plant was named after Narcissus of Greek mythology, who turned into this plant after killing himself because he could not reach his reflection in a pool.
  • Narcissus is a Greek name said to be derived from "narke" (numbness, torpor) in reference to its narcotic properties.
  • Very often grown in homes using just gravel and water. The bulbs contain essentially all of the nutrition and therefore only need water, light and carbon dioxide (from air) to grow and flower.
Recent Findings: Van Doorn (1997) demonstrated that when freshly cut daffodils (not paper-whites) are placed in the same tap water with freshly cut roses, the roses wilted very rapidly due to the slime that is exuded from the cut stem ends of the daffodil. However, if a germicide was added to the water such as bleach, this negative effect on roses can be eliminated. It is therefore important to hydrate daffodils in a solution that contains a germicide such as found in flower foods or the bleach example noted above.
Picture of Paper-White Narcissus Paper-White Narcissus
Common Name: Paper-White Narcissus
Botanical Name: Narcissus papyraceus (nar-SIS-us pap-i-RA-see-us)
Decorative Life: 13-27 days depending on where it is placed in the interior environment (light and temperature conditions).
Family Roots:
  • As a member of the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis family), its common relatives include Agapanthus, snowflake, snowdrop, Nerine, kafir-flower, Amaryllis and Lycoris.
  • Native to the western Mediterranean.
Personality:
  • Plant is classed as a monocotyledon, perennial produced from bulbs.
  • Produces from 10-20 very fragrant florets per leafless stem (scape) that is generally 15 or more inches long.
Availability: Winter-spring.
Flower Color: Mostly bright white. However, the subspecies "polyanthus" has pale sulphur-yellow flowers when they are young, becoming white as they age.
Tidbits:
  • Some references say this plant was named after Narcissus of Greek mythology, who turned into this plant after killing himself because he could not reach his reflection in a pool.
  • Others say that Narcissus is a Greek name said to be derived from "narke" (numbness, torpor) in reference to its narcotic properties.
  • Very often grown in homes using just gravel and water. The bulbs contain essentially all of the nutrition and therefore only need water, light and carbon dioxide (from air) to grow and flower.
  • Bulbs can be purchased by consumers and grown to flowering on a window sill or similar location. Care must be taken such that enough growing media (including sand or gravel) is placed over and below the bulbs such that their root development does not push the bulb out of the container.