Cosmos


3 entries found.
Picture of Cosmos Cosmos
Common Name: Cosmos
Botanical Name: Cosmos bipinnatus, C. sulphureus (COZ-mos by-pin-NAY-tus and sul-FER-e-us)
Decorative Life: 4-6 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Remove bottom leaves if present, recut stems under water and place in a hydration, bleach or flower food solution. Only use a flower food once you have determined that it is actually beneficial as mixing some cultivars and flower food results in decreased vaselife.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Compositae (aster or sunflower) family.
  • Native to Mexico.
  • Related species include chrysanthemum, dahlia, marigold, lettuce and zinnia.
Personality:
  • Flower heads up to 4 inches across, consisting of single row of ray flowers surrounded by a yellow center.
  • Stems leafy, 16-20 inches long.
  • Plant is an annual, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Summer-early fall.
Flower Color: C. bipinnatus: white, pink, crimson; C. sulphureus: red, orange, yellow.
Storage Specifics: 35F for up to two weeks in water.
Tidbits:
  • From the Greek "kosmos" (beautiful). The specific epithet names "bipinnatus" and "sulphureus" are in reference to the fine leaf structure and yellow flowers of the respective species.
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus is the chocolate cosmos with maroon-crimson flowers, 24 inch stems, and a slight chocolate scent.
  • Flowers can be dried with silica gel in 2-3 days.
  • The Compositae or aster family is vast, with over 20,000 species, and is also one of the most developed families. It was named Compositae because the flowers are actually a "composite" of many individual flowers into one head. Hence, when children pull one "petal" off at a time, saying "she/he loves me, loves me not", they are actually removing a complete flower, not just a petal.
Recent Findings: Gast (1998) showed that 'Pied Piper Red' lasted longer than 'Purity', 'Psyche' or 'Daydream' cultivars and they all exhibited reduced vaselife when held in a flower food solution compared to water alone. Using 'Sensation', Redman et al. (2002) reported that 35F storage temperature was best (they did not try lower temperatures). At this temperature flowers could be stored wet for a maximum of two weeks and neither STS or flower food were beneficial in enhancing flower life. Starman et al. (1995) rated 'Early Wonder', 'Versailles Carmine' and 'Versailles Red' as being very good income producers.
Picture of Cosmos Cosmos
Common Name: Cosmos
Botanical Name: Cosmos bipinnatus (COZ-mos by-pin-NAY-tus)
Decorative Life: 1-2 plus weeks.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Asteraceae or Compositae (aster or sunflower) family.
  • Native to Mexico.
  • Related species include chrysanthemum, dahlia, marigold and zinnia.
Personality:
  • Flower heads up to 4 inches across, consisting of single row of ray flowers surrounded by a yellow center.
  • Stems leafy.
  • Plant is an annual, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Year-round.
Flower Color: White, pink, crimson, lilac, rose.
Storage Specifics: 36-41F.
Tidbits:
  • From the Greek "kosmos" (beautiful). The specific epithet name "bipinnatus" refers to the finely cut leaves.
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus is the chocolate cosmos with maroon-crimson flowers, 24 inch stems, and a slight chocolate scent.
  • Some favorite cultivars and their respective flower colors include 'Sonata' (lilac, red, pink, rose, white) and 'Diablo' (scarlet with yellow centers). Full sunlight would be best.
  • The Compositae or aster family is vast, with over 20,000 species, and is also one of the most developed families. It was named Compositae because the flowers are actually a "composite" of many individual flowers into one head. Hence, when children pull one "petal" off at a time, saying "she/he loves me, loves me not", they are actually removing a complete flower, not just a petal.
Picture of Cosmos Cosmos
Common Name: Cosmos
Botanical Name: Cosmos sulphureus (COZ-mos sul-FER-e-us)
Decorative Life: 1-3 weeks.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Asteraceae or Compositae (aster or sunflower) family.
  • Native to Mexico.
  • Related species include chrysanthemum, dahlia, marigold, zinnia.
Personality:
  • Flower heads up to 4 inches across, consisting of a single row of ray flowers surrounded by a yellow center.
  • Stems leafy.
  • Plant is an annual, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Summer-early fall to year-round.
Flower Color: Red, orange, yellow.
Storage Specifics: 36-41 F
Tidbits:
  • From the Greek "kosmos" (beautiful). The specific epithet name "sulphureus" is in reference to the yellow flowers.
  • Cosmos atrosanguineus is the chocolate cosmos with maroon-crimson flowers, 24 inch stems, and a slight chocolate scent.
  • Some favorite cultivars and their respective flower colors include 'Cosmic Orange' and 'Cosmic Yellow'. Full sunlight would be best.
  • The Compositae or aster family is vast, with over 20,000 species, and is also one of the most developed families. It was named Compositae because the flowers are actually a "composite" of many individual flowers into one head. Hence, when children pull one "petal" off at a time, saying "she/he loves me, loves me not", they are actually removing a complete flower, not just a petal.