Camellia


2 entries found.
Camellia
Common Name: Camellia
Botanical Name: Camellia japonica (ka-MEEL-ee-a ja-PON-i-ca)
Decorative Life: Not very long under most circumstances, 3-4 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Remove bottom leaves if present, recut stems under water and place into a fresh flower food solution. Treat with an anti-ethylene product either prior to (STS, AVG) or during (MCP) flower food hydration step.
  • Try (test) flower foods with added calcium to see if it can aid in reducing flower abscission or spray with a calcium solution such as calcium acetate at 1.0 ounce per gallon of water. Only spray a few flowers at a time to see if it works.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Theaceae (tea) family.
  • Native to Japan, Korea and Taiwan.
  • Relatives include Franklinia, Ternstroemia and Stewartia.
Personality:
  • Waxy flowers 2-6 inches across, single and double forms, solitary on short branchlets on woody stems.
  • Stems cut to various lengths or individual flowers are harvested.
  • Plant is an evergreen shrub, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Very little if any fragrance.
Availability: Mostly spring.
Flower Color: White, pink, red, multicolored.
Storage Specifics: 45 F with high humidity.
Tidbits:
  • Named for Georg Josef Kamel, a Moravian Jesuit missionary who studied plants in the Philippines. There are over 2000 cultivars of this species.
  • Camellias were brought to America in the late 18th century and soon became a fixture in southern gardens.
  • Related to the tea plant, the Camellia’s flower was a garden treasure in China long before the flower was introduced to Western civilization. The Camellia is the plant from which Earl Grey and other popular teas are made.
  • Camellia sasanqua blooms in the fall, Camellia sinensis is the source of commercial tea.
  • Flower forms include single, semi-double, anemone, peony, rose double and formal double.
Recent Findings: Using 'Kumasaka', Doi and Reid (1996) noted that STS treatment prevented flower abscission but did not delay the occurrence of necrotic brown spots on flowers.
Camellia
Common Name: Camellia
Botanical Name: Camellia japonica (ka-MEEL-ee-a ja-PON-i-ca)
Decorative Life:
Post Harvest Care:
  • To help prevent flower bud abscission common when placed under interior environments, maintain high (80%) relative humidity and/or use anti-ethylene treatments. When treated with one anti-ethylene product (STS) up to 10 days before harvest, it was still effective. Whether this would also be true for MCP is unknown.
  • Some floral sprays that are used to reportedly extend flower life and/or improve the appearance of flowers and/or foliage can actually induce flower discoloration. Therefore, these products should be tested before being routinely used. They should also be compared to misting plants with water only.
Harvest Instructions: Pre- or postharvest spray applications of calcium offer some protection to premature flower abscission. In one test, about 1800 ppm calcium in the form of calcium acetate (about 1.0 ounce per gallon) was used effectively.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Theaceae (tea) family.
  • Native to Japan, Korea and Taiwan.
  • Relatives include Franklinia, Ternstroemia and Stewartia.
Personality:
  • Has shiny, large leaves up to 4 inches long on branching woody stems.
  • Plant is an evergreen shrub, classified as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Year-round.
Flower Color: Mostly red, white and pale rose.
Storage Specifics: During grower to grower long distance shipments and without flowers, can be stored 10-12 weeks.
Tidbits:
  • Named for Georg Josef Kamel, a Moravian Jesuit missionary who studied plants in the Philippines.
  • Camellias were brought to America in the late 18th century and soon became a fixture in southern gardens.
  • Related to the tea plant, the Camellia’s flower was a garden treasure in China long before the flower was introduced to Western civilization. The Camellia is the plant from which Earl Grey and other popular teas are made.
  • Stems provide excellent background for arrangements, individual leaves useful in corsages and boutonnieres.
Recent Findings: Using 'Benlodome', Lee and Song (1992) showed that flower bud abscission was 90% and flowering only reached 8% of potential when plants were held at 30% relative humidity whereas at 80% relative humidity abscission was reduced to 8% and 90% of the buds flowered.