Bellflower


2 entries found.
Picture of Bellflower Bellflower
Common Name: Bellflower, Canterbury Bells
Botanical Name: Campanula spp. (cam-PAN-you-la)
Decorative Life: Some state 5-7 days while others say 8-16 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Remove bottom leaves if present, recut stems under water and place into a fresh flower food solution.
  • Leaves generally deteriorate before flowers. These are heavy drinkers therefore it is important to maintain clean flower food solutions.
Harvest Instructions: One report states that flowers should be harvested when flowers are about 50% open while another states when the first flower is fully opened. Engle et al. (1994) noted that seed-propagated plugs can be stored at about 27F up to 6 weeks with or without a light and low temperature treatment prior to storage.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Campanulaceae (bellflower) family.
  • Native to Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean region.
  • Related species include Platycodon and Trachelium.
Personality:
  • Flowers bell-shaped to funnel-shaped, 1-2 inches wide and long, in loose clusters at the ends of long stems.
  • Stems 18-24 inches long.
  • Species are annual, biennial or perennial, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Mainly spring-fall but also year-round depending on species/cultivar.
Flower Color: Violet-blue, purple, pink, white.
Storage Specifics: 36-43F.
Tidbits:
  • From the Latin "campana" (bell) referring to the shape of the flowers.
  • Species useful as cut flowers: Campanula persicifolia, C. medium, C. glomerata, C. latifolia, C. pyramidalis.
  • Many species are commonly used in gardens, especially in rock garden environments.
  • First year roots and leaves of C. rapunculeus can be used in salads.
Recent Findings: Using 'Champion Blue' and 'Champion Pink', Bosma and Dole (2002) showed that vaselife in floral foam was 3.3 days whereas 10.0 days in a vase without foam, both with flower food solution.
Picture of Bellflower Bellflower
Common Name: Bellflower
Botanical Name: Campanula spp. mostly C. carpatica (kam-PAN-you-la)
Decorative Life:
Harvest Instructions: Using 'Karl Foerster', preharvest fertilization with either nitrogen only or a complete fertilizer reduced the postharvest life of flowers. Well-established 'Blue Chips' plugs can be stored frozen at 28F for up to six weeks and then forced with no reported damage. Engle et al. (1994) noted that seed-propagated plugs can be stored at about 27F up to 6 weeks with or without a light and low temperature treatment prior to storage.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Campanulaceae (bellflower family).
  • Common relatives include balloon-flower and throatwort.
  • Native to many temperate locations in the northern hemisphere but mainly in the Mediterranean area.
Personality:
  • Flowers bell-shaped to funnel-shaped, 1-2 inches wide and long, in loose clusters at the ends of long stems.
  • Species are annual, biennial or perennial, classed as a dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
  • Flowers are not fragrant.
Availability: Year-round.
Flower Color: Violet-blue, purple, pink, white.
Recent Findings: Using the cultivar 'Karl Foerster', Serek (1991) showed that supplementary light prior to harvest did not alter the postharvest life of the flowers but did improve the quality, number and opening of flowers. To the contrary, decreased light levels prior to harvest resulted in increased ethylene production by the plants after harvest. Serek and Sisler (2001) documented the positive effects of treating 'Dark Blue' and 'Blue Chips' with MCP to control ethylene-induced problems. Serek (1990) noted that high levels of ammonium fertilization during production caused increased abscisic acid and decreased cytokinin levels resulting in decreased flower life after harvest.