Flossflower


2 entries found.
Picture of Flossflower Flossflower
Common Name: Flossflower, Ageratum
Botanical Name: Ageratum houstonianum (a-ge-RAY-tum hew-ston-ee-AH-tum)
Decorative Life: 7-10 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Does not store well and leaves often dry out prematurely.
Harvest Instructions: Plants perform better in the landscape if grown in mixes containing both a wetting agent and hydrogel. Plugs can be stored for up to six weeks in the dark at 45F but do much better if provided as little as 5 ft-c of light during storage. Deeper and larger volume growing containers can improve shelf life.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Asteraceae or Compositae (aster) family.
  • Native of Mexico and Central America.
  • Related species include aster, sunflower, daisy and chrysanthemum.
Personality:
  • Flowers tassel-like in dense clusters.
  • Stems up to 24 inches in length.
  • Plant is an annual, dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
Availability: Summer through mid fall.
Flower Color: Blue, white, pink with some bicolors.
Storage Specifics: Can be held at 34-38F.
Tidbits:
  • The Compositae or aster family is vast, with over 20,000 species, and is also one of the most developed families. It was named Compositae because the flowers are actually a "composite" of many individual flowers into one head. Hence, when children pull one "petal" off at a time, saying "she/he loves me, loves me not", they are actually removing a complete flower, not just a petal.
  • Ageratum, Greek (a-, without, and geras, age) for not growing old probably in reference to the flowers retaining their color for a long time.
  • Named after William Houston, American physician who collected plants in the Antilles and Mexico, died in 1733.
  • Insects and diseases are often problems during production. Some favorite cultivars and their respective flower colors include 'Hawaii Blue' and Hawaii Royal (blue/violet). Full sunlight would be best.
Recent Findings: Using 'Blue Puffs', Latimer and Oetting (1999) showed that low nitrogen fertilzation reduced aphid infestation levels while ebb and flow irrigation reduced mite populations compared to overhead watering.
Picture of Flossflower Flossflower
Common Name: Flossflower, Ageratum
Botanical Name: Ageratum houstonianum (a-ge-RAY-tum hew-ston-ee-AH-tum)
Decorative Life: 7-12 days.
Post Harvest Care:
  • Remove bottom leaves if present, recut stems under water and place into a fresh flower food solution.
  • Does not store well and leaves often dry out prematurely.
Harvest Instructions: Plugs can be stored for 6 weeks in the dark (6 weeks in light) at 45F and subsequently grown into very acceptable plants and/or flowers. Cultivars like 'Horizon Blue' tend to produce longer flower stems as the growing season progresses.
Family Roots:
  • Member of the Asteraceae or Compositae (aster) family.
  • Native of Mexico and Central America.
  • Related species include aster, sunflower, daisy, chrysanthemum.
Personality:
  • Flowers tassel-like in dense clusters.
  • Stems 24 inches long.
  • Plant is an annual, dicotyledon, leaves not parallel veined.
Availability: Summer through mid fall.
Flower Color: Blue, white, pink with some bicolors.
Storage Specifics: 34-38F.
Tidbits:
  • Most cultivars grown as bedding plants.
  • Ageratum, Greek (a-, without, and geras, age) for not growing old probably in reference to the flowers retaining their color for a long time.
  • Named after William Houston, American physician who collected plants in the Antilles and Mexico, died in 1733.
  • Insects and diseases are often problems during production.
  • The Compositae or aster family is vast, with over 20,000 species, and is also one of the most developed families. It was named Compositae because the flowers are actually a "composite" of many individual flowers into one head. Hence, when children pull one "petal" off at a time, saying "she/he loves me, loves me not", they are actually removing a complete flower, not just a petal.